EIGHT OLD NYC THEATRES HAVE NEW USES

Once Palaces, Now Chain Stores

Starbucks, Drug Stores, Churches. Link courtesy of Glenview, IL THS member Carol Slingo
TEXT and PHOTOGRAPHS By KARLY DOMB SADOF, NY Times

THE first movie theater in New York City, the Regent, opened in a German section of Harlem in 1913, with a showing of “Pandora’s Box.” The Regent, at 116th Street and Seventh Avenue, was designed by Thomas W. Lamb and had about 1,800 seats. Since the 1960s, it has been an evangelical church.
The city is dotted with such old theaters — many recognizable by signature marquees — that have been transformed into coffee shops and drugstores, retail outlets and temples of exercise. Instead of showtimes, these marquees show the passage of time. . . . . .

Full story and slide show at
www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/11/14/nyregion/14marquee-ss.html

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  1. Warren G. Harris

    The article is riddled with errors, starting in the opening statement that the 1913 Regent was the first movie theatre in New York City, and then compounds that by mentioning “Pandora’s Box,” which had its first American release in 1929!

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