Lost Lansing MI Theaters & D-I’s

One Conclave is put to bed – the next is half way to reality!  Never too soon to begin telling you about all the fun in 2011! 

Unfortunately,  the theaters in this link will not be seen, they are all lost.  But thanks to BOB ASHLEY for finding this link to the “lost but not forgotten” theaters of Lansing:

 
From the website:
 
Big screens and balconies. Enormous glowing and flashing neon marquees. Saturday afternoon matinees. The old single screen movie house is a distant memory in Lansing. These theatres all had charm and atmosphere that is all but lost today. Greater Lansing area residents had up to nine indoor theatres to choose from. Today, there are none. The boring big box multiplexes came, and took away all of our classic theatres. Today, we have multiple mini screens, stadium seating and cupholders. Click on each theatre thumbnail for more photos.
 
 
From the website:
 
The crunch of the gravel under the car’s tires. The smell of hot dogs and popcorn from the snack bar. The crackle of the in-car speaker. The flicker of the movie up on the huge screen. The twinkle of stars overhead on a cool summer night. Those nights are all but forgotten. Especially in the Lansing area, which was once home to five Drive-In Theaters. Those included the Lansing Drive-In, the M-78 Drive-In, the Starlite Drive-In, the Northside Drive-In, and the Crest Drive-In. Sadly, none of these remain. Drive-In Theaters were not designed to last forever, and most fell into disrepair. Changing culture, rising land values, urban sprawl, and the arrival of home video all contributed to the demise of the drive-in. Click on each drive-in for more photos and history at Michigandriveins.com.

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Lost Lansing MI Theaters & D-I’s

One Conclave is put to bed – the next is half way to reality!  Never too soon to begin telling you about all the fun in 2011! 

Unfortunately,  the theaters in this link will not be seen, they are all lost.  But thanks to BOB ASHLEY for finding this link to the “lost but not forgotten” theaters of Lansing:

 
From the website:
 
Big screens and balconies. Enormous glowing and flashing neon marquees. Saturday afternoon matinees. The old single screen movie house is a distant memory in Lansing. These theatres all had charm and atmosphere that is all but lost today. Greater Lansing area residents had up to nine indoor theatres to choose from. Today, there are none. The boring big box multiplexes came, and took away all of our classic theatres. Today, we have multiple mini screens, stadium seating and cupholders. Click on each theatre thumbnail for more photos.
 
 
From the website:
 
The crunch of the gravel under the car’s tires. The smell of hot dogs and popcorn from the snack bar. The crackle of the in-car speaker. The flicker of the movie up on the huge screen. The twinkle of stars overhead on a cool summer night. Those nights are all but forgotten. Especially in the Lansing area, which was once home to five Drive-In Theaters. Those included the Lansing Drive-In, the M-78 Drive-In, the Starlite Drive-In, the Northside Drive-In, and the Crest Drive-In. Sadly, none of these remain. Drive-In Theaters were not designed to last forever, and most fell into disrepair. Changing culture, rising land values, urban sprawl, and the arrival of home video all contributed to the demise of the drive-in. Click on each drive-in for more photos and history at Michigandriveins.com.

Leave a Comment

You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *

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